"They had applied for immigration, and they had quite a low quota number, but it seemed like people that had higher quota numbers were being called to immigrate, and they weren’t. And eventually my grandmother (father's mother) figured out that…

"I believe they [Carl, Selma, and Ilse Simon] only were there [at Westerbork] a night or two before they were sent to Poland, to Sobibor concentration camp. And on the 21st of May, they were asphyxiated. And my mother and her sisters did not find out…

"They did correspond with them quite a bit, and the last letter – I have a copy of it-- it told the girls in England that they had a lot of faith in God, that the girls-- Edie and Ruth-- shouldn’t worry about them, that they would be fine, that…

"Eventually a group of compassionate Jewish citizens from the town of Harrogate, which is in the northeast corner of England came, and they were willing to take 25-30 young Jewish girls-- religious girls-- back to their community with them. And so,…

"Well, they were assigned to a cabin, and like I said, there were 1000 children on this transport. There were already children that were there from other countries. And what they were told to do was to make themselves as much at home as they could,…

"They eventually got to the hook of Holland, in Rotterdam, and they boarded a ship that took them across the English Channel and on to Dovercourt, England, and that was a summer camp with cabins, but they weren’t heated. And the crossing itself was…

"My grandmother got wind of a project that had been started by the English government that was called the Kindertransport. And they were sending trains to Austria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, and so forth, to save children from one to 17 years old. And…

"So my father rode back to his house. And when he got there, my grandmother told him that my grandfather had already come home once, and she told him to go back out because they Gestapo had been by looking for him, and they wanted to arrest him. So…

"My father was about eleven when Hitler came to power, and he had been enrolled in a school in Treuchtlingen, and was studying. And when he was 13 he became a Bar Mitzvah1, and then the German government shut down the school that he was attending,…

"Well [my father, Manfred Heinemann] was born in 1922, and he lived in a town called Treuchtlingen, which was in Bavaria. And they lived a very comfortable life. My grandfather sold baking supplies, and eventually his brother was born in 1933--…