Editor's Note: In his 2005 book, White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism, Kevin Kruse relates an important episode in Atlanta history in which W.A. Scott played a significant role. In 1948, W.A. Scott III built his family home…

Editor's Note: Scott's obituary in the Atlanta Daily World describes his postwar career as follows:"After the war, he returned to Atlanta and completed his education at Morehouse. He began his married life with Marian, and in 1948 became…

"I went to London a lot. I loved London. When I got older, we were able to catch a bus, or train, and go into London-- go to some of the newer movies. And then we'd have to take the last bus home, or else you'd be walking. Because they would quit at…

I had a green ration book because of my age. My brother had the blue, and my mom and dad had white ones. And I was able to get orange juice on mine, and we could get an egg once a week, and meat was almost inaccessible. My dad would buy some black…

"My parents got married in 1949, May 7th, and back then, they wore top hats, and my dad brought out his hat—they couldn’t figure for name for me—so they had a hundred names, and they would each draw a name and then I was, you know, maybe able…

"And my father’s father owned a delicatessen, so back then, you basically took over your family business, and it was a four-year tutelage, four year school, to be a butcher, Charcuterie, which is basically how to make sausage and so forth, salamis,…

"My mother was actually an au pair in London, so she learned to speak English, and she went to a business school, and she was a business associate at a department store in Copenhagen called Illum, and it's still, you know, in business today.

"I met [my Aunt Yvonne] when she eventually came to California and—came to Los Angeles where we lived—and they moved into an apartment with my grandfather and—basically, her mother and father—my grandfather and grandmother—and she had a…

"The International Relief Organization -- came into the camp, and they set up an office where the American soldiers and commander of the camp said, “Anybody that wants to go to the United States, sign up.” My mom went ahead and signed up. …

"[At the] end of 1947 we were transferred to a camp called Beth Israel outside of town called Hallein, which is about fifty miles east of Salzburg. And in this particular camp, there were actual rooms. It had a door. It had a window--very…